You Might Not Be Irritated at Your Spouse – It Could Be Thyroid Disease

We’ve all heard of it, but do you even know what your thyroid does?

The thyroid gland is one of the most important organs in the human endocrine system. Hormones produced in the thyroid (T3 and T4) are released into the bloodstream and help regulate how the body uses and stores energy. When everything works as it should, thyroid hormone levels are tightly controlled by the pituitary gland in the brain. Loss of this control leads to thyroid hormone levels that are either too low (hypothyroidism) or too high (hyperthyroidism), and abnormal levels can have negative effects on the heart, bones, cholesterol levels, glycemic control, and a lot of other metabolic processes. Thyroid disease is actually fairly common in the general population (especially in women) and risk increases with age. Unfortunately, people living with diabetes have an increased risk of developing thyroid dysfunction.

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism is by far the most common thyroid disorder in adults, and Hashimoto’s disease is easily the most common cause of hypothyroidism. Hashimoto’s is an autoimmune disease in which the immune system attacks the thyroid gland and slowly kills it off over years or decades, leading to a decline in thyroid hormone levels. Symptoms of hypothyroidism may include fatigue, weight gain, intolerance to cold, constipation, dry skin and hair, muscle cramps, aches, decreased concentration, and depressed mood.

Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism from an overactive thyroid gland is much less common. Graves’ disease (another autoimmune disease) is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism. Symptoms may include fatigue, weight loss, heart palpitations, frequent stools, tremors, anxiety, irritability, sweating, intolerance to heat, and dry/irritated eyes. Many of the symptoms of thyroid dysfunction are what we call “nonspecific”, meaning that they could be caused by any number of diseases (like sleep apnea, depression, obesity, and poorly controlled diabetes) or even lifestyle issues (such as poor diet, lack of exercise, stress, etc). The thyroid gets a lot of blame, but sometimes it’s not the thyroid’s fault!

Diabetes and Thyroid Disease

Diabetes and thyroid disease are related in a number of ways. First, it has been shown that having one autoimmune disease increases the chance of developing another autoimmune disease. Therefore, people (especially women) living with type 1 diabetes have a higher rate of both Hashimoto’s and Graves’ disease compared to the general population. Second, there may be an association with type 2 diabetes and thyroid dysfunction, especially hypothyroidism. One study showed that people with low thyroid function were at a greater risk of progressing from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes. Finally, untreated hyperthyroidism generally leads to increased insulin requirements and worsened glycemic control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Screening and Treatment

Regular screening for thyroid dysfunction should be done in everyone with diabetes; roughly every 1-3 years in type 1 diabetes, and every 3-5 years in type 2 diabetes. The best way to test for abnormal thyroid function is to get a TSH level during a blood draw. If the TSH is normal, the thyroid is working well and no further testing is necessary in most cases. However, if the TSH is out of the normal range or the physician has a high suspicion for thyroid problems, other tests may be ordered including free T4, total T3, TPO antibody (associated with Hashimoto’s), TSI/TRAb (associated with Graves’), or thyroid imaging. If hypo- or hyperthyroidism is diagnosed, your physician should discuss treatment options with you or refer you to an endocrinologist for consultation. Hypothyroidism is treated by replacing the thyroid hormone, usually with a once-daily oral medication called levothyroxine. Treatment for hyperthyroidism depends on the exact cause, with options ranging from medications, to radioactive iodine therapy, to surgery. In both hypo- and hyperthyroidism, the TSH levels should be monitored during and after treatment to assure normal thyroid hormone levels are achieved and maintained. Regular testing of thyroid dysfunction is important for everyone with diabetes, but the good news is that treatment options are available, management of the condition is possible and getting your thyroid numbers in a normal range is very achievable.

13 Comments
  1. I have been able to find very little information on the correlation between the 2 diseases. I have had T1D for 44 years and recently was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s. I was disappointed as the endocrinologist said it was thyroiditis and we would monitor. She did not say what they were looking for specifically. The TPO antibodies were at 522. The TSH level was rising and both T3 and T4 were at the bottom of the range. I finally went to my primary care physician and my TSH was 14.45. I was disappointed in the process for treatment. I was finally prescribed levothyroxine. I could not find any information regarding what the TPO antibodies should be absent a thyroid condition. My primary care physician said that because I have T1D I will always show antibodies, but didn’t know the level. My TSH went from 4.21 (4.5 was the upper limit) to 14.45 in 4 months and was tested twice in between. I was glad to see the article.

    • Hi Tricia,
      It is not uncommon for thyroid function values such as the TSH to bounce from high to low, and what’s more important is what your numbers are and how they even out over time. The one issue with thyroiditis is that your thyroid levels can change over time, typically getting lower and lower and then needing the medication that you were put on. So just hang in there, get your thyroid tested every 3-6 months, and you should be fine.

  2. the endocrinologist I saw informed me that the TSH level Goal was About 1.

    • Hi Cindy,
      The normal TSH range is different in every laboratory, but 1 sounds like it is in the normal range, though not 100% sure.

  3. I appreciate this work amazing post for us I like it.

  4. I’m so glad to see someone put up a post about thyroid-related matters. My wife also suffering from thyroid i will share this article with her.

    Thanks.

  5. Hypothyroidism is a condition that occurs when your thyroid gland doesn’t produce enough thyroid hormones.
    There are many glands in the body, but the thyroid gland is the small, butterfly-shaped organ at the base of your neck that makes hormones that regulate your metabolism — which affects how the body uses energy — and other processes. While your body goes through hormonal changes every day (hello, mood swings!), big dips — like those that occur during hypothyroidism — can signal danger, as a lack of thyroid hormone production causes the body’s functions to slow down.

  6. Hyperthyroidism due to Graves’ disease is caused by antibodies attacking the thyroid and turning it on (see Graves’ disease brochure). Antithyroid medication, radioactive iodine, and surgery are all effective treatments and can restore thyroid function to normal. Radioactive iodine and surgery also can “cure” the hyperthyroidism by removing the thyroid. However, the thyroid stimulating antibodies often are unaffected by these treatments, so the underlying cause of Graves’ disease persists. Occasionally, the thyroid stimulating antibodies do go away in patients treated with antithyroid drugs, resulting in remission of the Graves’ disease and allowing for discontinuation of the medications. However, the thyroid stimulating antibodies may return causing the Graves disease to relapse.

  7. High amounts of T4, T3, or both can cause an excessively high metabolic rate. This is called a hypermetabolic state. When in a hypermetabolic state, you may experience a rapid heart rate, elevated blood pressure, and hand tremors. You may also sweat a lot and develop a low tolerance for heat. Hyperthyroidism can cause more frequent bowel movements, weight loss, and, in women, irregular menstrual cycles.

    Visibly, the thyroid gland itself can swell into a goiter, which can be either symmetrical or one-sided. Your eyes may also appear quite prominent, which is a sign of exophthalmos, a condition that’s related to Graves’ disease.

  8. Your thyroid is a small butterfly-shaped gland found at the base of your neck, just below your Adam’s apple. This gland makes thyroid hormone that travels in your blood to all parts of your body. The thyroid hormone controls your body’s metabolism in many ways, including how fast you burn calories and how fast your heart beats.

    Your doctor’s choice of treatment will depend on your symptoms and the cause of your hyperthyroidism. Treatments include:

    Antithyroid medicines block your thyroid from making new thyroid hormone. These drugs do not cause lasting damage to the thyroid.
    Beta-blockers block the effects of thyroid hormone on your body. These medicines can be helpful in slowing your heart rate and treating other symptoms until one of the other forms of treatment can take effect. Beta-blockers do not reduce the amount of thyroid hormones that are made.
    Radioiodine. This treatment kills the thyroid cells that make thyroid hormones. Often, this causes permanent hypothyroidism.

  9. What meds are good for thyroid? And can we online at any online store like mygenericpharmacy or amazon.

  10. For me Thyrolin works in the best way. I use it since some time already and I’m happy with results. How it’s gonna work on the long run? I’ll find out later. I buy it here: http://nplink.net/5zbalpML

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